Compounding


Compounding allows us to create custom medications specifically for you with the exact dosage and form specifically designed for each individual. Examples include dye-free, preservative-free, alcohol-free, and/or sugar-free forms of medications.

FAQs:

Can my child or elderly parent take compounded medication?

Yes. Children and the elderly are often the types of patients who benefit most from compounding. Often, parents have a tough time getting their children to take medicine because of the taste. A compounding pharmacist can work directly with the physician and the patient to select a flavoring agent, such as vanilla butternut or tutti frutti, which provides both an appropriate match for the medication’s properties and the patient’s taste preferences.

What kinds of prescriptions can be compounded?

Almost any kind. Compounded prescriptions are ideal for any patient requiring unique dosages and/or delivery devices, which can take the form of solutions, suppositories, sprays, oral rinses, lollipops and even as transdermal sticks. Compounding applications can include: Bio-identical Hormone Replacement Therapy, Veterinary, Hospice, Pediatric, Ophthalmic, Dental, Otic (for the ear), Dermatology, Medication Flavoring, Chronic Pain Management, Neuropathies, Sports Medicine, Infertility, Wound Therapy, Podiatry, and Gastroenterology.

Will my insurance cover compounding medications?

Because compounded medications are exempt by law from having the National Drug Code ID numbers that manufactured products carry, some insurance companies will not directly reimburse the compounding pharmacy. However, almost every insurance plan allows for the patient to be reimbursed by sending in claims forms. While you may be paying a pharmacy directly for a compounded prescription, most insurance plans should cover the final cost.

Is compounding expensive?

Because compounded medications are exempt by law from having the National Drug Code ID numbers that manufactured products carry, some insurance companies will not directly reimburse the compounding pharmacy. However, almost every insurance plan allows for the patient to be reimbursed by sending in claims forms. While you may be paying a pharmacy directly for a compounded prescription, most insurance plans should cover the final cost.

Compounding has been part of healthcare since the origins of pharmacy and is widely used today in all areas of the industry, from hospitals to nuclear medicine. Over the last decade, compounding’s resurgence has largely benefitted from advances in technology, quality control, and research methodology. The Food and Drug Administration has stated that compounded prescriptions are both ethical and legal as long as they are prescribed by a licensed practitioner for a specific patient and compounded by a licensed pharmacy. In addition, compounding is regulated by state boards of pharmacy.

Does my doctor know about compounding?

Prescription compounding is a rapidly growing component of many physicians’ practices. But in today’s world of aggressive marketing by drug manufacturers, some may not realize the extent of compounding’s resurgence in recent years. Ask your physician about compounding. Then get in touch with a compounding pharmacy, one that is committed to providing high-quality compounded medication in the dosage form and strength prescribed by the physician.

Can my pet take compounded medication?

Yes. Apple Valley Pharmacy also offers veterinary compounding services.

 
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“Love Apple Valley, I wouldn't trust anyone else when it comes to my kids....They honestly care about their customers and are incredibly knowledgeable. Had to get medication for my 9 year old son's Lyme Disease this morning, and I feel so much better knowing they compounded it for him; they even made it in his favorite grape flavor. By far, the best pharmacy in Orange County!” – April V